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Scully as the monstrous-feminine
"In terms of the monstrous-feminine, the narrative [of ‘The  X-Files’] aligns Scully with the monsters, distancing her from Mulder.  More than anything else, it is Scully’s body, both in its configuration  as object and as site for motherhood, that codes her as monstrous in the  narrative of the series. In season two’s ‘Humbug,’ for example,  Scully’s breast is visually paralleled to a man’s mutant conjoined twin,  suggesting a connection between the female body and a mutant body. The  same episode, which concerns a town of side show performers being preyed  upon by the mutant conjoined twin, ends with Blockhead, a  self-proclaimed ‘self-made freak,’ lamenting to Scully a future  populated by genetically perfect humans. During the course of this  conversation, Blockhead points to Mulder as a physical example of the  dreaded ‘perfect’ human, asking Scully to ‘imagine going through [her]  whole life looking like that.’ This conversation differentiates  Mulder-as-perfect-specimen from Scully; Blockhead doesn’t point to her  as an example of the nonmutant, rather his statement aligns her with the  mutant body. This conflation of the monstrous with the feminine (and  with the specifically feminine features of Scully’s body) is  representative of the way that the narrative consistently aligns women  with monsters."
- ‘The Truth Is in Me’: Reproduction, Technology, and Woman as Monster by Lacy Hodges

Scully as the monstrous-feminine

"In terms of the monstrous-feminine, the narrative [of ‘The X-Files’] aligns Scully with the monsters, distancing her from Mulder. More than anything else, it is Scully’s body, both in its configuration as object and as site for motherhood, that codes her as monstrous in the narrative of the series. In season two’s ‘Humbug,’ for example, Scully’s breast is visually paralleled to a man’s mutant conjoined twin, suggesting a connection between the female body and a mutant body. The same episode, which concerns a town of side show performers being preyed upon by the mutant conjoined twin, ends with Blockhead, a self-proclaimed ‘self-made freak,’ lamenting to Scully a future populated by genetically perfect humans. During the course of this conversation, Blockhead points to Mulder as a physical example of the dreaded ‘perfect’ human, asking Scully to ‘imagine going through [her] whole life looking like that.’ This conversation differentiates Mulder-as-perfect-specimen from Scully; Blockhead doesn’t point to her as an example of the nonmutant, rather his statement aligns her with the mutant body. This conflation of the monstrous with the feminine (and with the specifically feminine features of Scully’s body) is representative of the way that the narrative consistently aligns women with monsters."

- ‘The Truth Is in Me’: Reproduction, Technology, and Woman as Monster by Lacy Hodges

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